Tag Archives: Anime Reviews

Review: Nobunagun, Episode 9: Sio and Kaoru

Review:

Okay, so this episode kind of made up for last week’s abundance of objectionable content. We pick up with the aftermath of last week’s battle, with Sio hospitalized and Dogoo strategizing. As you can probably figure, the battleship class Evolutionary Invasion Object has to be taken out, but the EIOs seem to have figured that out themselves, as they are keeping Dogoos other platoons busy throughout the world. It’s a tense situation, contrasted by… Sio and Asao playing catch up.

Now, that’s not to say it’s boring or ill paced, but just that the moods are a bit contrasting. This, at least, is the case until Asao starts filling Sio (and, by proxy, us viewers) in on what’s been happening in the world since the Objects showed up. People are fleeing and buying out food, with Japan apparently being a refuge. If you bothered to watch last week’s previews, though, then you’ve probably already figured out that this won’t remain the case for long.

In truth, this episode serves to pose more questions than answers. For example: How does a certain character survive what appears to be certain death? How does another character manage to attack? And, what does Jack have that he needs to discuss with Sio? Hopefully next week’s episode will, at least, answer that third question. What this all comes down to is this: I enjoyed this week’s episode.

A Christian Perspective:

Well, there were a couple instances of vulgar language, as well as some violence this time around, although I’m not telling you anything that you haven’t experienced from Nobunagun before. In terms of language, though, it is much more toned down than last week. There is, of course, that usual awkwardness of “what is Sio and Asao’s relationship supposed to be, exactly?”, but that seems to be resolved this episode, with the answer being nothing more than friends. Outside of that, there is the issue of a certain character attempting to communicate with the soul of the figure inside them (I guess that’s kind of like necromancy, although in this case maybe it’s more like finding the power inside you or some anime trope like that), as well as a certain character’s ability to use some form of unexplained energy to attack. In other words, a bit of a supernatural flare to the sci-fi setting, so let that be to you what it will.

In looking at the lessons we can learn this time around: the Japanese apparently weren’t too concerned about the potential of and EIO attack, as seen by one man’s disbelief at another’s claim to have noticed an EIO. That, of course, turns out to be true when Japan finds itself attacked. We, as Christians, can take this as a bit of a warning. In 1 Peter 5:8, the apostle Peter warns his readers to, ” Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.” (NIV) Much like the Japanese let their guard down and were attacked, so we Christians can (and usually, probably do) let our guards down and end up being attacked by the devil. Could Japan have stopped the EIO attack? Well, no, but they could have prepared. This is kind of where the comparison falls apart, because we, as Christians, have what we need to repel the devil, if only we will keep our eyes open. Let’s not get weak, then, and assume that the devil would never attack our little corner of the world, lest we end up like Japan after that EIO attack.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “d***it”, 1 “s**t”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: Explosion in the beginning of the episode; a car explodes, and a man presumably dies; an EIO is hit by a car; a man is impaled by an EIO, and his car explodes; an EIO is shot; EIOs are slashed apart

Blood/Gore: None

Other: The usual Sio/Asao awkwardness, but the nature of their relationship seems to finally be clarified; a character calls out to the soul of the person inside of her; a character shoots an energy ball

Review: Love, Chunibyo, and Other Delusions! REN, Episode 8: The False… Mori Summer [Or “Holy Spirit Mother”]

Review:

Nibutani episode, go! Well, maybe character-specific episodes would appeal to me more if I’d been with these characters longer. In any event, this episode follows the plot thread that was started during the school trip episodes, when Nibutani found out about the Mori Summer web site. Now that Yuta and Rikka have grown closer (I would have been happy with more awkward relationship cuteness, though), it’s time to settle the score here.

With all that said, I’m not sure how to feel about this episode. The fake Mori Summer is a creep, which, granted, isn’t treated like it’s okay, but there is a lot of occult imagery in this episode, including a scene where several characters are sitting around a table with a pentagram on it. Nibutani claims it helps locate things or something. Granted, it ultimately does nothing, but it still has the look of an actual occult ritual, and that is not okay. More on that, though, in the Christian Perspective.

So content wise, yes, this episode is a bit discomforting in some aspects, particularly in regards to the occult symbology. Outside of that, there are some amusing aspects, including Nibutani’s complete embarassment over the things she used to do when she went around pretending to be (or perhaps believing herself to be) Mori Summer. We can thank Sophia for that. At the very least, the characters seem to realize that all of this is in their imaginations (or at least, the really fake, fake Summer does, as she comments that she has the greater power of imagination). The fact that all of the other characters seem to be able to see what’s going on in the delusions makes me wonder if they share the delusion or what, but at that point I’m just over-thinking a show. It would be interesting to see a cross-section of what is actually happening when they’re imagining these epic battles, though.

A Christian Perspective:

Ugh, this episode…. Part of my reasoning/justification/what have you with the pentagrams and stuff was that at least it was all make believe. This episode, though, had to go and include Nibutani actually performing an occult ritual where she sits around a table with a few other characters. The table has a pentagram drawn on it, and candles are lit around it. Supposedly, it’s to locate something. Granted, nothing actually happens, and I probably could just wave this away as a case of, “Well, they didn’t glorify the occult by making it look like it had any power”, but how much should I–or any Christian who desires to be discerning, for that matter–wave away and excuse before we stop? Now, does this kind of stuff open up our minds to accepting the occult and allowing Satan in? Honestly, I don’t know. For those who have previous ties to the occult, I would definitely think so, and advise they stay away (although I would suggest not even watching this show at that point). For the rest of us? Honestly, I don’t know. I like Chunibyo more than I dislike it, but this kind of stuff leaves me unsure of whether I should actually continue watching it. There are, of course, other instances of occult items, particularly pentagrams, throughout the episode.

The other thing, too, is that there is some mild yuri (or, perhaps, shoujo-ai) content in this episode. The fake Mori Summer, for example, is after Deko, and yes, in that way. She tries to kiss Dekomori, she makes a comment about Dekomori’s “thingies” being as cute as a baby’s, and she is shown chewing on Deko’s ear. There is another scene, too, where it is revealed that Deko and Nibutani have apparently kissed in the past, although they insist that it was an accident. Both characters are blushing in the scene, though, so I’m not sure what the implications here are, and I don’t know anything about the incident itself. I assume it happened in the first season.

My other issue is the title, or rather subtitle, of “Holy Spirit Mother”. Granted, I doubt they’re referring to the Holy Spirit, but it still sounds wrong…

Of course, there is also an imaginary battle in this episode, although that hardly seems worth mentioning in light of the other stuff. Despite all of this, I still do want to finish this series, although I’m questioning my previous intention to go back and watch the first season. Christian viewers, what are your thoughts? Am I over-thinking this? Or should I drop this?

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: The fake Mori Summer tries to kiss Dekomori, off-screen she makes a comment that Deko’s “thingies” are as cute as a baby’s (don’t ask me what the “thingies” are), and she is shown chewing on Deko’s ear;

Violence: A character is yanked up by the shirt and then tossed; the same character is later tossed again; a character is knocked to the ground; two characters engage in an imaginary battle where they fight with magic; the fighting sends characters flying around; a character intervenes with a giant hammer

Blood/Gore: None

Other: Pentagram on the clubroom floor; the “Mabinogion” (or however it’s spelled) is referred to as “scripture”–specifically, the statement is scripture of the Mabinogion (sp?); Nibtuani is shown to have a number of occult items, including a tarot card, cards with a pentagram on the back, and a book with a pentagram on the cover; Nibutani, Yuta, Rikka, and Kumin are shown sitting around a table–the table has a pentagram on the top of it, and candles are lit around it; characters are using magic in an imaginary battle; the fake Mori Summer is apparently into girls; apparently, Nibutani and Dekomori kissed in the past (though it is supposedly an accident), and they are blushing as they argue (hopefully this isn’t going down the path of being yuri)

Review: Golden Time, Episode 20: His Chasm

 

Review:

Well, I wasn’t expecting THAT to happen! It may not be too far of a stretch to say that this was one of the best episodes of Golden Time in a while. Granted, a lot of the episode does revolve around Banri trying to figure out how to give Koko the ring, but even that doesn’t make it a bad episode. To be honest, that ring has fared better than I thought it would. I expected it to be lost or something during this episode, since it is clearly very important to Banri. While this episode had its moments of drama (Banri and Oka’s torn friendship, Mitsuo’s attempt to talk to Linda), it felt more laid back than anything. It was kind of nice. You wanted to see what happened next, and at the same time were able to kind of kick back and just enjoy the episode. And then the ending came. Seriously, that came out of nowhere, and caught me completely by surprise. I suppose it’s possible that I just lack an eye for foreshadowing (actually, I think it’s pretty safe to say I do), but I did not expect it at all. I won’t say what happened for those of you who haven’t watched it yet, though.

Another great bonus to this episode is that it was fairly clean. There were a few things, but nothing that I foresee being an issue for most viewers. Honestly, I don’t have much else to say. It was just a very enjoyable, entertaining episode, and it’s certainly nice to see Banri and Koko’s relationship growing, to the point that he can easily discuss the issue about Oka with Koko without Koko getting jealous or suspecting foul play. Also, getting ice cream to keep society running (or however Koko put it) is the best excuse for getting ice cream ever. Except, you know, for the reason of, “I just wanted it.”

 A Christian Perspective:

There’s not a lot of stuff to warn Christians about this time around. A character curses once, and the two female members of the Festival club who were interested in Mitsuo are shown in what might be considered seductive poses (although they are clothed, and the whole thing is really just in someone’s mind). Really, that’s the worst this episode has, unless you really don’t like blood, in which case there is one instance of blood in-episode, and one during the previews. The preview also shows Koko wearing a top that shows some cleavage. I’d probably rank this one low on the danger scale, although don’t let my words sway you from any conviction you may feel as you read this. God is the ultimate decider, not me.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “d**n”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: There’s a scene that shows two of the festival club girls in seductive(?) poses, although they aren’t dressed provocatively; Koko is wearing a top with some cleavage in the preview

Violence: None

Blood/Gore: Blood is scene shooting from a character’s nose (comical scene); in the preview, a character is shown with blood coming out of his nose

 

Review: Engaged to the Unidentified, Episode 8: Only A Little Sister Can Cure A Scar Left By A Little Sister

Review:

Prepare for the confrontation of the spirit people!…. in the second half, that is. Really, that’s where the plot of this episode mainly lies. The first half is more like a bunch of scenes of Benio being creepy, as well as comments about breasts and butts (primarily Kobeni’s). That’s the majority of what the Nudity/Sex/Fanservice section is about, actually. While these jokes aren’t particularly new to the series (poor Kobeni has been the target of comments for most of the series), it still doesn’t make them any more welcome. I suppose the first half may have some good moments (the only ones coming to mind are Kobeni sharing her taiyaki with Hakuya and Mayu “telling off” Niko), but prepare for a lot of Benio creepiness and jokes at Kobeni’s expense.

The second half actually picks up with the subject matter that starts this episode: the fact that Konoha is the same as Mashiro and Hakuya. This is where we also finally get to see a “confrontation”, if you will, between them. Don’t expect any flashy fights or displays of abilities, though; it doesn’t exactly go that way. It all simply builds up to the end of the episode, where we get a new plot twist thrown in (although don’t be surprised if you at least suspect it before the end–the thought at least crossed my mind). More amusing than anything is seeing Benio’s reaction to Kobeni telling her that something is none of her business, as well as seeing the effect Benio has had on Mashiro and Hakuya.

In the end, this is one of those shows that ends up being a mixed bag for me, I think. Sometimes I really look forward to seeing what happens next, and others I’m just kind of watching it. I don’t think I’ve ever had a moment where I truly disliked it, but at the same time I wouldn’t declare it to be anything great or ground breaking, either. A little more focus on Kobeni and Hakuya would be nice, too.

A Christian Perspective:

There are quite a few breast and butt jokes in this one. While there is only one scene with questionable content (Kobeni is shown putting on a pair of jeans, and I’m not quite sure what part of her body is being shown due to how close the camera is), the breast and butt jokes still have the potential to lead one astray. If you hear it enough, you may begin to think about it. If you think about it enough, it could snowball into more. So be aware that those are there. There’s also a scene where Hakuya flashes back to Benio holding a pair of Mashiro’s underwear.

God’s name is taken in vain by Benio, in the form of “Oh my G**”, and there are a couple instances of blood. Overall, this may not be the most Christian-unsafe episode of the show, but if you are not fond of the type of jokes in this episode, then maybe skim or skip the first half.

Language: 1 “Oh, my G**”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: Benio inquires as to whether Kobeni’s chest has gotten bigger, and she states the previous month’s measurements (creepy…); Benio thinks Kobeni might be a boy, then comments about the proof, the “two bulges on her chest” (again, creepy…); Kobeni is shown pulling up a pair of pants, and the camera is zoomed in really close, although I couldn’t tell what, exactly, was being shown in terms of flesh (may have just been the back of her thighs, but it could have been her butt); a conversation ensues about Kobeni’s butt being big; comments about Kobeni’s breasts being big; Konoha comments on the size of her own chest and butt; a flashback to Benio holding a pair of Mashiro’s(?) underwear; breast size jokes in the episode preview

Violence: None

Blood/Gore: Blood is shown running from a character’s mouth; a character coughs out blood

Review: Gundam Build Fighters, Episode 5: The Strongest Builder

Review:

Well, now Sei has a rival. Wait, wasn’t that Yuuki? Or was he Reiji’s rival? Bah, whatever. Anyway, the first post-credit scene in this episode seriously feels like a fanboy’s sales pitch for Gunpla. Sei and Ral basically blurt out a bunch of reasons as to why Gunpla is fun outside of the battling aspect. I suppose I should take some notes, though, as my own Gunpla are basically built by instruction and then stuck on a shelf (or back in the box as they wait for a place to be displayed). Well, anyway, it’s not really a criticism as much as it is a point of humor.

I also find it humorous as to how big Gunpla apparently is in the world of Build Fighters. The trucker from the opening, for example, seems to appreciate the Gunpla he’s given as payment for a ride, and one character even uses a Gundam model in an attempt to hit on a woman (what’s more is that it actually works, at least until Reiji shows up). Then, in contrast to all of this, is China’s dad, who is basically not open to the idea of taking Gunpla as payment. I guess not everyone likes Gunpla, even in a world where it seems like everyone loves Gunpla. Or he just has better business sense. One of the two.

So, like I said, Sei now has a rival in terms of building Gunpla. This comes to a head when the two decide to display their custom Gunpla, at which point a battle ensues. You’ll be disappointed to know, though, that the battle only takes place in the minds of the two combatants. Somehow they manage to have a mental battle (no, it’s not suggested that they’re psychic or anything like that) where they battle with their Gunpla. Don’t expect to find out who wins, though. If that’s not enough, though, we do get a very brief competition battle at the end of the episode, with a post-ending credits scene that continues with the plot line introduced at the end of the previous episode’s post-ending credits scene.

Well, what else can I say? Not much, really. It was nice to see a rival introduced who isn’t a total jerk. Granted, he does come across as one at one point, but in the end it seems more like a friendly (though serious) rivalry, much better than Kirara, who tried to sabotage Sei’s Build Strike. It will be interesting to see if we will find out who’s stronger later on down the line (although let’s face it, if this keeps up with typical anime stereotypes then the win is already assuredly Sei’s). Gundam Build Fighters continues to be a fun show, even if it isn’t the most original or innovative concept out there (let’s face it, there are plenty of toys-used-in-battle shows out there).

A Christian Perspective:

Not a whole lot to say on this one. The worst thing, as far as content goes, is an apparent use of God’s name in vain, specifically “Oh my G**”, except said in Italian. What the character says, specifically (and I include this simply for the fact that I may be wrong, and someone may wish to correct me) is “Oh dio mio”. As far as I know, “dio” is the Italian word for God, so…

Other than that, there is just the typical violence of Gundam battles (admit it, that’s what you’re here for, anyway) and a woman wearing a low cut top, thus showing cleavage. You know, it occurred to me that I could really expand this section by exploring themes in an episode. I have nothing for this episode in particular, but maybe I’ll keep it in mind for the future.

Content Guide:

Language: If my limited understanding of Italian is correct, a character basically exclaims “Oh my G**” in Italian

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: A woman is shown wearing a dress/top (not sure which) that shows cleavage

Violence: Gundam battles

Blood/Gore: None

Review: Gundam Build Fighters, Episode 4: Gunpla Idol Kirara

Review:

If you’re wondering what happened to episode 3’s review, well… I seem to have lost it. I did the content guide, and then never got around to writing the review. Now I can’t find my file. I suppose I’ll have to go back and re-watch that one and do a review at some point, but I really wanted to watch the next episode.

So, anyway, this episode is honestly pretty predictable. It doesn’t take a lot to figure out the plot twist, if you can call it that, but the story is still entertaining enough, and the reveal during this episode’s big battle would probably be a bit of a surprise, if I hadn’t already read about the Build Strike on Wikipedia…

In a way, it was a cute episode, at least when you pay attention to Kousaka. Her interest in Sei probably isn’t much of a surprise, either, but it’s still kind of cute to watch her reactions in this episode. On the other hand, though, they do bring in some fanservice this time around. Granted, it’s probably mild as far as fanservice goes, but it’s still there and it’s still worth nothing. I’m specifically referring to Kirara’s attire. They enjoy showing her a bit provocatively when she’s performing, she dresses in a skimpy outfit, and the camera seems to enjoy centering on her breasts. It’s not prevalent enough to ruin the episode, but it does raise the question of, “Why?” Fanservice, in my opinion, is never necessary, and particularly so in a show about kids building models.

With that said, let’s get to the meat of why you’re probably here: Gundam battles. While the battles may not make up the majority of the episode, the main battle for this episode is still entertaining to watch, especially if you don’t know the Build Strike’s secret. It’s a fun watch, as always. I did notice a few errors in the subtitles, though. Again, this isn’t something that ruins the episode, but I’m low on things to say, and I don’t think I criticize a lot, so I included it.

A Christian Perspective:

Well, Kirara. Skimpy outfit, cleavage, camera centering on her breasts… yeah, stuff like that is prevalent. There is no nudity, and most people would probably consider this mild, but I must question why this was included. I mean, it’s probably safe to classify this more as a kids’ show, so the Kirara fanservice–mild or not–seems completely out of place, and is something we could do without. Even excluding the close ups of her breasts (and yes, she was clothed) would have been an improvement. Other than that, there was the violence of the Gunpla battles, which I have simplified as, well, Gunpla battles in the “Violence” section simply because the nature of the battles doesn’t change: guns, beam swords, explosions, etc. If it’s in one episode, it’s probably in all of them.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: Kirara dresses rather skimpy, in the equivalent of what we might as well call a bikini top and “booty shorts”, if you will. The camera makes it a point to zoom in on her (clothed) breasts, and some of her poses are a bit provocative. Also, she shows some cleavage. Ditto pretty much all of that for her appearance at the Gunpla battle. The camera focuses on her breasts a few time.

Violence: Gunpla battles

Blood/Gore: None

 

Review: The Piltot’s Love Song, Episode 8: The Name of the Bird

Review:

Well that was… intense. We pick up pretty much where we left off last week, with the trainees going out to fight against the enemy in an attempt to defend Isla. Of course, Isla is getting devastated at the same time, and really the whole thing is just a huge mess. The vast majority of this episode is devoted to action scenes, so if you’re not a fan of violence/combat then this may not be too enjoyable for you. Of course, skipping this episode may raise questions in subsequent episodes (such as, where did so-and-so go?).
 
Honestly, this was a sad episode, and at the same time kind of frustrating. Killing off a couple of well-developed characters is certainly a good way to get an emotional reaction. Massacring a large number, on the other hand, kind of dulls the feeling, because it stops being surprising after a while. I suppose there is always the potential that the viewer will hold on to hope until a character is gone. Okay, I suppose I was fairly disappointed when I saw who all died this time around. I guess it is a bit conflicting, too. On the one hand, I think it probably would have been more impactful to just have a couple characters killed off. On the other hand, I suppose it is more realistic to see a bunch of trainees in garbage planes get decimated by the much more advanced enemy aircraft (thanks Crunchyroll comments section).
 
The Crunchyroll comments section does raise another good point, though, of how the trainees were able to shoot down armored planes with their rifles, while one trainee plane takes a decent amount of damage and still remains airborne. It didn’t occur to me until reading that, but I suppose that is a bit over the top. It may just be that it’s easier to suspend your disbelief while watching the show, though, and I never would have thought it absurd had I not scrolled through the comments. Such is the price I pay for reading through them, I suppose.
 
My final point of criticism is the end of the episode. The two characters featured there seem way too happy, given the number of people they just watched die. Granted, I’ve never been through a combat situation, and I certainly don’t know what it feels like to be among the few survivors of a tragic event, so maybe there is some legitimate explanation for it, but seeing two characters tease each other while showing no real signs of sadness kind of makes the moment feel unrealistic.
 
Despite all of these criticisms, though, I wouldn’t even think to call this a bad episode. That probably doesn’t make much sense, but I did enjoy it, and wanted to see what would happen. Honestly, they do kind of keep you wondering about a certain character’s fate (a character whose death would probably be more impactful than any of the others that took place this time around). We also get to see Ignacio actually do something this time around. I’m still not sure what his ultimate role will end up being, but thanks to the last episode we now have an idea as to what his purpose on Isla is. Judging from the previews, next week’s episode also appears to be intense, although in a different way, especially if what I think is going to happen actually happens.
A Christian Perspective:
Violence is the primary issue this time around, at least if you are opposed to portrayals of violence. Thankfully none of it is “graphic” or gory, although there is some blood shown, but even that is scarce, which is surprising given the number of deaths in this episode. There is plenty of air combat going on, as well as human versus human combat. Beyond that, there are a few uses of vulgar language, one of which involves Jesus’ name in vain.
Content Guide:

Language: 2 “d**n”, 1 “j**z”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: Houses and buildings are bombed; planes fire at each other; planes go down in flames; a person is shown falling in the wreckage of a plane; anti-aircraft fire; people fire at each other, one person is shot; a man is shot through the head; more people are shot; more plane-on-plane gunfire, more planes destroyed, a scene that shows a gunner shot and killed; another gunner is shown to be shot and killed

Blood/Gore: Possibly some blood coming from the person falling in the plane’s wreckage; blood is shown soaking through a character’s jacket; another character has a cut with blood on his face

Review: Nobunagun, Episode 8: Tunnel

Review:

Well, plot wise this was certainly a step up from the previous episode. Also, in light of the information discussed at the beginning of this episode, I suppose they added some deeper purpose to last week’s episode, although I still feel like there wasn’t a whole lot added to the series by that one. Before we get to the meat of this episode, though, we have to deal with an extended unsavory scene, from about 4:38 – 6:00, but more about that in the Christian Perspective section.

In particular, this was a pretty decent episode for character development. While Galileo’s devotion to Vidocq isn’t anything new, this episode shows just how far she’s willing to go for him. It also goes to reinforce how cold Vidocq can be. I still don’t have a good feeling about that guy. While he seems to be working for the advancement of Dogoo’s goal, I still think he comes across as suspicious. Maybe it’s just because he’s a cold character, but I wouldn’t be entirely surprised if he betrays the organization at some point. Of course, the true development was seen in our titular character.

Maybe character development isn’t exactly the most accurate term, but Sio certainly stepped it up this time around. At one point in the episode, her conjectures are quickly dismissed, but we see the value of her ability to analyze a situation come into play near the end of the episode. It’s a side of Sio’s (or rather Nobunagun’s) character that I don’t believe we’ve seen before, and hopefully it will earn her some more respect from the team.

As you probably expected from the last episode, First and Second Platoon are brought together this time, and we see how the two teams don’t exactly get along. I’m sure this will be the subject matter of a future plot point, or at least it should be. If the two teams continue in their rivalry (or just their general inability to get along), it can only serve to hinder Dogoo’s operations. That, or Nobunagun will just become an overpowered killing machine.

A Christian Perspective:

First, let me just say this: skip 4:38 – 6:00. Seriously. It adds nothing to the episode and is just pure, pointless fanservice. Sio is having a dream, in which we see her, Asao, and Newton in bikinis, all showing cleavage, with Asao’s top showing even more of her breasts (possibly about half). In the dream, Jack and Ghandi also show up, with the former in swim trunks and the latter in a speedo. In the dream, they’re gay. Newton also shows up and claims that Sio is her lover. She goes to kiss Sio at one point, though we are spared the visual of them actually kissing. There is absolutely no rhyme, reason, or purpose to this whole scene, so I feel no reservations about saying that Christian viewers–and indeed, any viewer with a measure of discretion–should simply skip this portion of the episode.

Beyond that, the use of vulgar language is certainly amped up this time around, especially when compared to last week’s episode. This may change based on how you view this episode (I watch Crunchyroll’s subs for those unaware); I’m not sure how translations work, so some translators may translate more or less curse words. Violence is, of course, present, as it has been in pretty much every episode of Nobunagun. There is some actual human blood shed this time around, too. It certainly isn’t the most violent entry in this series, though.

There you have it. My biggest gripe, as always, comes down to the fanservice. Violence in an action show is to be expected, and we could certainly debate about how Christians should approach violent media, but for me it’s not a particular stumbling block. If it is for you, then you should probably avoid Nobunagun. We could certainly do without the foul language, though.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “j**z”, 1 “d***it”, 3 “b*st**d”, 1 “s**t”, 2 “h*ll”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: Asao is shown in a skimpy bikini, with her top showing ample cleavage (possibly more like half her breasts), and Sio is also shown in a bikini, thus cleavage (at least, that’s the term I’m using to describe it); Jack is shown in his swim trunks (so, shirtless) and Ghandi is shown in a speedo; Newton is also shown in a bikini (thus, again, cleavage); Gaudi’s picture of Sio in a bikini again makes an appearance

Violence: Three characters are hit by a tentacle; an EIO is sliced; an EIO has its tentacles sliced and stomped; exploding EIOs are launched at the E Gene holders; a portion of a ship is blown up; a character is hit in the face with a piece of debris

Blood/Gore: Blood is shown running down a character’s face; a character is shown with a bandaged face, and blood can be seen seeping through

Other: Sio has a dream where Jack and Ghandi are lovers, and in this same dream Newton pops up and claims that she is Sio’s lover; in the dream, Newton goes to kiss Sio (complete with the tongue animation), though we don’t actually see her kiss Sio (this is from about 4:38 – 6:00)

 

Review: Nobunagun, Episode 7: Musashi Wonder

Review:

Hm… that was a bit underwhelming. Not that it was a bad episode, and not that it wasn’t entertaining, but it didn’t really serve much of a purpose. It was pretty formulaic. Evolutionary Invasion Object shows up, Sio and team mobilize, plan is executed, minor (and I mean minor) snag is encountered, team is victorious, the end. Like I said, not bad, but not particularly ground breaking, either. It was average. Nobunagun is an action anime, and it delivered action, so at the very least it accomplished its goal.

I honestly have very few thoughts about this one. Sio geeks out a bit over the ship, and we seem to get a little bit of history, but that’s about it for what I would consider noteworthy. I guess if I wanted to go super patriotic, then I would complain about how they depicted the American military as prideful, but I didn’t really take any offense to it. So… yeah, that’s about all I have to say. If nothing else, they at least appear to be bringing together the two teams we’ve been introduced to (based on the end of the episode), but maybe doing that at the beginning of the episode would have made this one more interesting.

A Christian Perspective:

Well, it’s Nobunagun, so of course there’s human-on-monster violence, but that probably isn’t anything you didn’t already expect. There is a bit of fanservice, with a shot of Sio’s butt in her battle suit (which is pretty much skin tight), though it’s probably debatable as to whether this can be called fanservice or not. I include it here just in case it would be a stumbling block for a brother. At the end of the episode we see the team in their bathing suits: Sio in a school swimsuit, Galileo in a two piece, Newton in a two piece, and Jack and Ghandi in swim trunks. The worst we see in all of this is perhaps a bit of cleavage from Newton, who is lying down with the back of her top undone. Again, though, I include this in case it would be a stumbling block to a brother (or sister, as there are shirtless guys). Foul language only occurs twice, although one instance is of Jesus’ name in vain.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “h*ll”; 1 “j**z”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: There’s a scene of Sio from behind as she is preparing to run–she’s not naked, but she is in her battle suit, which is pretty skin tight, and the camera is pretty much set on her butt; Sio is shown in a one piece school bathing suit, and Galileo in a two piece (nothing particularly erotic, though); Newton is shown lying on her stomach with the back of her bikini top undone, but I think the worst we see is some cleavage; Jack and Ghandi are shown in their swim trunks (and therefore topless); see previous episode note about new ending

Violence: Ships fire missiles and shots at another ship; more shots fired at a ship; missiles are fired at a ship; EIOs are sliced; eggs are smashed; EIOs are shot; an EIO is destroyed, followed by explosions

Blood/Gore: There is some kind of ooze that comes out of some EIOs when they are cut

 

Review: Love, Chunibyo, and Other Delusions! REN, Episode 7: Triangle… of Missed Encounters

Review:

How many cute scenes can this show pull off? Seriously, the end of this week’s episode topped the end of last week’s. Granted, we had to wait for it, and leave it to Sophia to create all of the waiting for us. If you think you’re going to get a cute episode of Yuta and Rikka exploring together, think again, because Sophia pops up, and we know how that goes.

With that said, it certainly doesn’t stop the episode from being amusing. Watching Yuta and Sophia work together to retrieve Sophia’s bag from a monkey, for example, was quite entertaining. I think I might fail a bit at common sense, though, because I really can’t understand Rikka’s reaction and subsequent actions to Sophia giving Yuta a certain item. On the other hand, it does open up the opportunity for a particular scene between the two female characters that sheds some light on the whole chunibyo thing, and after hearing Sophia’s story I have to wonder if Rikka will slowly start to grow out of her chunibyo.

This brings us to another point, though: while Yuta seems to have put his chunibyo behind him, he seems more than happy to occasionally break it out for Rikka. Simply see his actions at the end of last week’s episode as well as this week’s. I don’t know if he is actually aiming to break Rikka of her chunibyo or not, but if he is then indulging the delusions isn’t the way to go. Then again, perhaps his willingness to make a spectacle of himself says something about the genuineness of his love for Rikka. Who knows.

In the end, the events of this episode were kind of a mess. Not in the sense that it was sloppy and incoherent, but just in the sense that it created a lot of drama. The end result, though, was certainly cute, and overall worthwhile.

A Christian Perspective:

I’m coming up empty here. Sure, there are the couple entries in the Content Guide: one instance of vulgar language, and a fantasy where Rikka uses magic to freeze lava. There’s also a scene that shows Dekomori with a picture containing a pentagram in her bedroom. Honestly, that would probably be my biggest issue with this episode. I really just don’t get the obsession with the pentagram–couldn’t they have just made something up instead of using an actual occult symbol?

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “d**n”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: None

Blood/Gore: None

Other: Rikka has a delusion where she uses magic to freeze lava; Dekomori has a picture with a pentagram in it hanging on her bedroom wall