Tag Archives: Anime Reviews

Review: Engaged to the Unidentified, Episode 10: I Looked Up The Term “Time Of Dere”

Review:

Is it wrong that I find yandere Benio to actually be less creepy than “normal” Benio? Well, anyway, we get a mix of the two in this episode, and I really don’t know which side is exposed more. Hopefully we’ll eventually see Benio actually become normal, but somehow I doubt that. Poor Mashiro will probably just end up bearing the brunt of Benio’s attention.

Moving past that, though, there were some pretty good moments in this episode. One of the best (and cutest) was probably Hakuya’s devotion to finding a gift that he could match with Kobeni. It’s nice to see him becoming more “expressive”, or at least getting more screen time. I wonder what this series would be like if it was actually shown through Hakuya’s eyes. At any rate, his scenes still end up being amusing, such as one scene where he refers to Kobeni as “mai waifu”. Hakuya is not the character you would expect that to come from, so it was extra funny (even if it only came from him searching the internet).

On top of that was the scene with what I’ll call “Kobeni’s stare of doom”. I can’t recall seeing Kobeni getting angry in this series, but this episode certainly got close to it, at least. It was definitely enough to scare Benio and Mashiro… maybe that will teach them to spy on the odd couple. Honestly, Kobeni and Hakuya’s relationship really ends up being the most entertaining part of this series, and maybe that’s because it’s not the only focus. Instead of the whole show being focused on their progress, it’s broken up between characters, with sections focused on Suetsugi and Niko, not to mention other characters. I don’t think this series will be worthy of any “season’s best” titles, but the parts of it that I enjoy I really enjoy. It probably would have been better without Benio, or at least without her tendencies. A simple over-protective sister would have worked just as well.

A Christian Perspective:

Leaving aside Benio—because by now we know she’s creepy by Christian, and really any, standards—there are only a few things to be concerned about. In terms of fanservice, there really isn’t any, although there are some weird camera angles. One shot, for example, is focused on Benio’s butt, although she’s wearing a skirt, so you don’t actually see any of her butt or anything fanservicey. Another scene is focused on Suetsugi’s thighs. Again, you don’t see anything fanservicey, but it’s a weird angle. Outside of that, there is one mildly violent scene (a character slams into another) and a few instances where a character has blood coming from her mouth.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: There is a scene where the camera is focused on Benio’s butt–she’s wearing a skirt, and there’s nothing particularly sexual about the shot (as in, you don’t actually see her butt or anything), but know that it happens; another weird camera angle where the camera is focused on Suetsugi’s thighs (again, nothing that’s actually sexual is shown); an extended shot of Kobeni nervously shaking her hips while she talks (the camera is far back and not zoomed up on her, but it feels like they keep that shot up for a while)

Violence: A character slams into another character

Blood/Gore: A character has blood running out of her mouth (I think the same character also had a bit of blood spray from her mouth directly before this scene; the same character also has a line of blood running down the corner of her mouth later on, too

Other: A character imagines some sort of energy manifesting around her hand

Review: Gundam Build Fighters, Episode 8: Encounters of Fighters

Review:

So now things get a little deeper in terms of plot. Instead of the show just being about a boy and his aspirations of world domin—er, I mean stardom–we now have an organization and a scientist out to win the tournament for their own means. This is also a mostly Sei-less episode, and even when we do see him, he doesn’t play a prominent role. No, this episode is all set up. That’s not to say it’s bad–there are two Gundam battles that take place with two new characters who will probably play a bigger role later on.

Er…. to be honest, that’s all I’ve got. I watched this episode a little less than a week ago, and kept putting off writing the review, so I really don’t have much else to say.

A Christian Perspective:

It’s Build Fighters, so of course there’s violence in the form of Gundam fights. Other than that, there is a mild case of what could be called fanservice when the camera pans up the body of a female fighter in a tight body suit. Outside of that, this episode is fairly clean (based on my notes in the Content Guide, at least).

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: The camera pans up the body of a female fighter in a tight body suit

Violence: Gundam battles

Blood/Gore: None

Review: Love, Chunibyo, and Other Delusions! REN, Episode 9: Resort – Last Resort

Review:

Oh, of course we couldn’t get through a season without a beach episode, so prepare for bikinis and cleavage. That said, at least this episode actually had a plot. In the beginning, it does play more like a typical, “Oh, we’re going to the beach and doing a random side job” episode, but it ends up actually having a point. At least it makes the episode more than just mere fanservice, although with the majority of screen time spent at the beach there are bikinis a-plenty.

The way this episode went, though, seems to destroy my previous line of thinking. Originally, I thought the point would be that Rika would be cured of her chunibyo by her relationship with Yuta. After the way this episode resolved, though, that may not be the case. In any event, the episode resolves by creating another point of drama, which, I suppose, will begin to play out next episode.

A Christian Perspective:

Plot or not, this episode is chock full of fanservice. To be honest, though, it doesn’t feel like they play it up, i.e., it didn’t really seem like they went out of their way to sexualize the fact that the female characters were in bikinis. Regardless, though, there were female characters in bikinis, and there was lots of cleavage. To make matters worse, there are times where the camera is basically zoomed in so what we see is a bust shot (chest on up) of the female characters, which places the subtitles more or less across their breasts, which makes averting your eyes from the cleavage very difficult. There are some other camera shots to be aware of, as well, which can be seen in the Content Guide. Outside of that, there was one instance of harsh language and some violence, both real and imagined.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “h**l”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: Beach episode, so you know the trappings: girls in bikinis and cleavage, both within the main cast and random extras; several times, the camera presents us with a bust shot, which places the subtitles right across the female characters’ breasts; woman in a bikini in the second in-between still photo; there are some iffy camera angles, too–at one point, Deko is doing a sort of dramatic pose thing, and the camera briefly focuses on her bathing suit-clad butt; another time, Deko is preparing to jump, and the camera zooms in on her from behind (thus, again, camera on her butt, though I think the intention was probably more to focus on the fact that she was about to jump); as she’s attacking, the camera sort of pans up her body (again, not really anything sexual, per se, but just know it’s there); there is a scene where a female character is “powering up”, so to speak, and the camera focuses on her lower region briefly, and also on her chest briefly (she’s wearing a bikini); in another scene, a bikini-clad girl is rubbing her chest over her heart, which means a close up of cleavage

Violence: A character is hit in the head with a ladle; a character is hit over the head with a wooden sword… twice; a character is hit on the head with a ladle; two characters are fighting

Blood/Gore: None

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 10: Sky of Courage

Review:

Well, that takes care of Ignacio’s back story. Seriously, does anyone in this show have a happy past? Granted, this does make it more interesting as to why he seems to be going out of his way to help Kal. Once that’s over, we get a resolution to last week’s ending, and then more plot happens. The happy moments may never return to this show, as our characters are yet again sent out like sheep to the slaughter as another enemy attack is coming. This time, though, we see divisions caused, especially with the military staff, and a large portion of the student base actually flees. Only two pairs of pilots actually fly out. One pair is probably protected by plot armor, but the other duo… I don’t expect them to make it back alive.

Where the show will go from here is anybody’s guess. It seems a little soon to have another heavy tragedy on our hands, so maybe my prediction about character deaths won’t come true. The battle seems believable enough, as they are pretty much in enemy territory. The bigger problem, though, will probably be the internal struggles that will result from the military’s decision to again use students in battle, despite the previous battle’s losses. That’s… about it, really. I’m short on commentary for this episode.

A Christian Perspective:

While it’s not used in a sexual sense, there is some partial female nudity near the beginning of the episode. A woman has a blanket(?) draped around her shoulders, so a portion of her breasts is exposed. Other than that, there is no nudity or sexual content to this episode, but there is some cussing, including one use of the Lord’s name in vain, and of course there is violence. There is also a scene where a character seems to hear a deceased character speaking to him, kind of like how Luke Skywalker heard Obi-Wan tell him to “use the force” in the first Star Wars movie. A little supernatural there, if that kind of stuff makes you nervous.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “h**l”, 1 “j**z”, 2 “d**n”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: A woman is showed with only a blanket draped around her, exposing part of her front, including a portion of her breasts

Violence: A character is punched, kneed in the stomach, and back-handed, and punched, kneed, and punched some more; a man is thrown to the ground; another man is detained by two guards; heavy aerial fire, a plane getting shot down; air combat, planes shot down

Blood/Gore: None

Other: A character seems to receive inspiration from a deceased character in an Obi-wan “use the force, Luke” kind of way

Review: Nobunagun, Episode 10: Dogoo

Review:

Well, this episode proved to be a good effort at teasing the audience. In truth, I had forgotten about the end of last week’s episode, which was probably a good thing, as that plot line doesn’t pick back up until somewhere near the middle of the episode. The first portion instead devotes itself to the Commander’s past, how she met Kyubey’s bulked up cousin and Saint Germain, and how she actually became the Commander. I don’t really feel like it added anything significant to the plot, and it very well may have been little more than filler, but it was interesting enough to not be boring.

When we pick back up with the present time and our main cast, we first get to see what’s happening between Jack and Sio. Elsewhere, we see characters observing the battleship class EIO while others strategize how to go about defeating it. Without spoiling anything, the episode kind of continues in this vein, becoming more intense as more realizations are made and as strategies are planned. The climax of the episode comes when everyone is in position, the plan is just commenced, and then it ends. That’s right. You’ll have to wait until next week to see this operation put into play. As frustrating as it is, I think it was well done. It built up the tension and prepared the viewer for the upcoming battle, leaving us eager for the next episode.

With the way things are going, I’m going to estimate twelve or thirteen episodes for this one. If this has been confirmed elsewhere, then feel free to ignore me. The current mission seems to be building towards a climax, and I’m not sure where they could go from here, especially if they manage to wipe out what appears to be the nest of original cells. I could be proven wrong, though.

A Christian Perspective:

In comparison to previous episodes, the content isn’t as bad this time around, but there are issues to be concerned with. A young female character is shown nude three times, although the degree of depiction never gets worse than, say, a Sailor Moon transformation scene (except without the sparkly lights). There are some violent depictions too, although that’s definitely nothing new for this show, and there are a few scenes with blood. Cursing is present this time, too, but not nearly as much as it has been before. There are some supernatural elements to this episode, too. At one point, a character cries, and her tears land on some kind of talisman that she’s holding, which causes another character to appear. Also, a different character seems to be immortal (and may very well be within the show, if he’s based off of the historical figure that some Crunchyroll users seem to think he is).

As for lessons a Christian could take from this episode: One character seems to get a burst of inspiration after tapping into the e-gene inside of them. Much like these characters possess the genes (and maybe the souls?) of deceased historical figures, so Christians possess the Holy Spirit. Of course, the Holy Spirit is obviously greater than any human being, but the purpose wasn’t to compare the two, but simply to say that as this character listened or tapped into or otherwise interacted with the e-gene inside themself, so Christians should be listening and responding to the Holy Spirit. Much like this character was inspired by the e-gene, so should we be inspired by the Holy Spirit. “But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you.” (John 14:26, NIV)

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “p***es”, 1 “s**t”, 1 “h**l”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: A young female character is shown naked, though in a non-descript manner, three times, and her second and third appearances are a little more descript

Violence: Scenes of samurai fighting and archers firing arrows; someone is impaled; a village is destroyed; cannon fire; a pile of dead bodies; a container bounces off a character’s head

Blood/Gore: Blood spray can be seen coming from a character who is impaled with a sword; blood is shown running along the ground

Other: A village is shown littered with dead bodies; a character’s tears land on some charm-looking things, which seems to summon another being; some possible supernatural elements in regards to one character’s seemingly endless life

Review: Gundam Build Fighters, Episode 7: World-Level Ability

Review:

The beach episode. It seems that not many anime escape this stereotypical episode, and Gundam Build Fighters goes right along with it, bikinis and all. Okay, in all fairness, it’s not as sexualized as some shows tend to be, but there is still plenty of cleavage from unnamed random female characters and Sei’s mom. Thankfully, the beach portion of the show only compromises a small segment of this episode, instead of making up the majority of the content. Eventually, plot kicks in.

So, the whole point of this episode is that the tournament winners have been given a trip to a hot spring, hence how Sei and Co. end up at the beach. Afterwards, at the hot spring/inn, Mao shows up again, although if you’re hoping to finally see a showdown between Mao and Reiji, you’ll have to wait some more. Mao, though, is downright funny to watch as he shirks the luxury of relaxation in favor of lending a hand to the girl working at the inn, a desire born from his obvious attraction to her. Meanwhile, Sei’s mom is plotting ways to get China with Sei. Of course, we all see this as the obvious pairing, but wouldn’t it be a bit creepy if our mom’s did this in real life? Or maybe they have/do? Eh, well, not much changes there, anyway.

If this episode is beginning to sound dull to you, don’t worry. Some land sharks show up to break up the vacation feel of the episode, and in true Build Fighters form, the gangsters (if the term is appropriate) agree to settle their demands with a Gunpla battle. Yes, it’s absurd, but let’s just suspend our disbelief. We’re already watching plastic models come to life, anyway. Besides, this seems to be a reliable formula for the show: stuff happening, and eventually a Gunpla battle. It’s simplistic, it’s predictable, but I can’t say it feels old, at least not yet, and perhaps I’m being too generalizing to say that that’s the formula the writers are using, but it certainly feels like there is a big battle in every episode. Of course, it would be kind of lame to make a show about battling models and then rarely have people actually battle models. Well, anyway, now I’m just filling space.

A Christian Perspective:

Keep up your guard for the first part of this episode: Sei, Reiji, China, Ral, and Sei’s mom are headed to the beach, which comes complete with nameless female characters in bikinis (so, cleavage), along with China in a two piece (although it provides decent coverage) and Sei’s mom in a bikini (which is definitely cleavage heavy). There’s also a still shot with Sei’s mom diving to hit a beach ball, where she doesn’t have the wrap around her waist. Granted, she’s just wearing a typical bikini bottom, but I still feel it’s worth mentioning. There’s also a scene where Reiji is asked about China’s bikini, which prompts Reiji to look back and forth from China and Sei’s mom, clearly comparing their chest sizes. His subsequent comment earns him a smack (violence). So yeah, the first few minutes aren’t particularly friendly for anyone who struggles with sexual temptation. Beyond that, the episode gets back to being fairly content friendly, with the only noteworthy mentions being the fact that a truck is crashed through a building, and Ral makes a comment about the “goddess of victory”. Whether or not that last one makes you uncomfortable depends upon whether you just wave such things off as nonsense or not, I suppose.

One good lesson this show delivers—not just for Christians, but for anyone in general—is that violence is not the answer.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: It’s a beach episode, so there are female characters shown in bathing suits, and especially bikinis, which of course expose cleavage; male characters are also shown in swim trunks; there is a scene where Reiji is asked what he thinks of China’s swimsuit, and he clearly begins to compare the size of China’s chest to that of Sei’s mom—nothing is explicitly said, but it’s obvious what’s going on

Violence: Gundam battle stuff; a character is smacked; a truck is crashed through the front of a building

Blood/Gore: None

Other: Ral makes a comment about the “goddess of victory”

Review: Golden Time, Episode 21: I’ll Be Back

How you may feel at the end of this episode. Screenshot taken from: http://www.crunchyroll.com/golden-time/episode-21-649605

How you may feel at the end of this episode.
Screenshot taken from: http://www.crunchyroll.com/golden-time/episode-21-649605

Review:

Episode 21 starts us off some time after Banri’s break down at the end of the last episode. The Festival Club is in trouble, and Banri is scared of disappearing. In retrospect, it’s actually kind of a somber start to the episode, before turning into something a little more cheerful. Banri and Koko finally decide to expose the truth about Banri’s condition to everyone over food. We also get to find out why, exactly, Oka has been acting the way she has towards Banri, along with what her true feelings are. Amidst all this is more drama, more friendship, and en ending that will possibly leave you angry, sad, confused, or a mixture of those and more.

It’s nice to see this show finally back in its stride. At the beginning of the series, I was a bit lukwarm, until the third episode. The start of the second half/season/what have you was kind of lackluster, too, but I’ve really enjoyed the show recently. Well, that’s not to say I didn’t enjoy it up until this point, too, but I feel like this is certainly better. The only complaint I can really file against this episode is that the preview kind of breaks some of the tension, because it appears to show something of a resolution to this episode’s cliff hanger. I won’t say anything, but you’ll understand when you watch it. So, yeah, that’s about it. Golden Time, Episode 21. Watch it.

A Christian Perspective:

This was a mild episode, in terms of content. In terms of fanservice, Koko wears a shirt that reveals a bit of cleavage at one point, though it’s not a lot. There are a couple scenes of mild violence, too, particularly when a character stops someone with a headbutt (which also causes a little blood to be spilled). That’s about it.

In terms of theme, I think a good verse to apply here is: ” One who has unreliable friends soon comes to ruin, but there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother.” (Proverbs 18:24, NIV). When one character is going through a tough episode in this…. episode… two friends make it a point to catch up to him and find out what’s wrong. Granted, they could have gone about this in a better way, but they could have simply ignored their friend who was obviously distraught. How many of us are guilty of being bad friends and turning our backs on a friend when they’re in need?

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: A shirt Koko wears shows a bit of cleavage

Violence: A character is slapped and knocked to the ground; a character is headbutted in the face

Blood/Gore: A bit of blood is seen coming from the nose of the character hit in the face; a character has a bloody tissue sticking out of his nose

Review: Engaged to the Unidentified, Episode 9: How Humiliating, I’m So Embarrassed

Review:

Well, I was hoping to see a whole lotta nope in response to that marriage proposal, but I suppose the end result is still the same. We all know that the love rival never has a chance, yet we’re still entertained by any rollercoaster rides that may come with it. Truly, we see the same trope played out in various ways through different shows, and yet we never seem to tire of it. Well, maybe never isn’t quite accurate, but isn’t the love rival a typical occurrence in romantic comedies (or straight romance shows), and don’t they always lose? Really, though, it feels like Engaged to the Unidentified included a love rival for the sake of fulfilling an obligation rather than actually creating any kind of rivalry. Let’s face it: Hakuya is all about Mashiro, and Konoha just doesn’t get the kind of attention to make her seem like a serious love rival.

That said, this episode was a weird mix of drama and comedy. The comedic side of things worked really well, but the dramatic side kind of left me scratching my head. Maybe Konoha’s inclusion was simply to shake Kobeni up and make her realize how she really feels about Hakuya, but I still don’t get the scene where Kobeni started crying. The following scene–where Benio overreacts to the excuse given for Kobeni’s crying, which causes Hakuya to overreact right along–was quite funny, though. It was also amusing to watch Mashiro create more of a predicament for herself in her attempt to ruin Konoha’s interest in Benio. Speaking of Benio: yes, she was still creepy in this episode (though not as much as others), but one must wonder if she’s something of a yandere after she briefly snaps near the end of the episode. It will be interesting to see if they play that up or not.

So yeah, Engaged to the Unidentified continues to be an interesting show for me. On the one hand, I enjoy watching it every week. On the other hand, there isn’t really anything in particular that I would say draws me to it. There’s nothing that really makes me say, “You need to watch this because _____” or “I really like this because ____”. Basically, I like it, and yet I can’t really say why I like it. It seems possible that we might actually start moving towards more romance, given the way this episode ends, though. Maybe. Also, you have to love how the little sister is more observant than the older brother.

A Christian Perspective:

In comparison to previous episode’s, this one was rather mild. There were still scenes with Benio being her old creepy self, such as when she offers to “take responsibility” and then proposes marriage to Mashiro (of course, you know the answer to that), and there was the other obsession of Konoha towards Benio, particularly when Konoha is shown nuzzling a picture of Benio. There weren’t as many stand out moments, though, so I don’t know if they’ve toned down the Benio stuff or if I’m becoming desensitized to it. Hopefully it’s the first one and not the second. Beyond that, there was a scene where the camera is moving down Benio’s body, and it pauses briefly on her breasts. She’s wearing her uniform, and there’s nothing particularly sexualized about the scene, but it still is a camera shot of Benio’s breasts. In the episode preview, Benio also comments that Mashiro has kittens or kitties on her panties. Also, there is one scene with minor violence when one character shoves another one down.

So, while it looks like a lot when typed out above, this episode really was mild in comparison. Benio still is, and probably always will be, the most uncomfortable portion of the show, although Konoha may be a close second. If you’ve been able to stomach Benio up until this point, though, then this episode should be an easy one.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: The camera is moving down Benio at one point, and briefly pauses on her breasts (she is clothed); in the preview, Benio pops up and comments that Mashiro has two kittens or kitties (not sure which) on her panties

Violence: A character is knocked to the ground

Blood/Gore: None

Other: Konoha gets giddy over a picture of Benio; Benio offers to “take responsibility” and asks Mashiro to marry her

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 9: Your Name

Review:

Hey, what’s that sound? Yeah, that whistling sound, what is it? Oh, right, that’s the sound of the Feels Train coming into station. Seriously, I felt myself tear up a bit when everyone was mourning the loss of their friends, and the episode just keeps it up from there. Of course, I think last week’s preview sort of ruined the big “reveal” of this episode, if I remember correctly, but seeing how it plays out is still worth seeing, and a bit unexpected, although I don’t quite get how the two characters who connect the dots between Claire/Nina Viento actually manage to do so. Their revelations are just kind of… there, but it’s possible that I’ve missed something. There was actually a discussion about this in regards to one of the characters in the CrunchyRoll comments section (yes, I do spend some time there), but I won’t regurgitate that here.

So yeah, we’re left with the remainder of our cast broken-hearted, our hero dismayed, and our heroine not exactly in good shape, either. Where this is all going is anyone’s guess, although next episode’s preview shows us a flight pairing that I didn’t exactly expect. It’s also interesting to see just how much Ignacio is opening up as a character. While the flower scene turned out to not be exactly what I thought it was (I assumed he brought the flowers of his own volition, but that appears to be wrong), his actions to help another character part way through the episode, as well as his actions at the end of the episode, seem to suggest that he might have a heart in there somewhere. What his overall role in the story will be, I don’t know, but right now he certainly appears to be more friend than foe, and hopefully it’ll stay that way.

I’m going to predict that this will be a full 25-26 episode series, as I really don’t see how they can tie this story up in three or four episodes, at least not without it being a rush job. It still continues to be an enjoyable show, and I look forward to seeing what happens next week. I wonder which train will come into the station then?

A Christian Perspective:

There wasn’t much concerning content in this one. The worst was the violence, most of which was in the form of flashbacks, although there is something of a beat down at the end of the episode. Honestly, though, if you were fine with the previous episode, then the violence in this episode should be tolerable. Truth be told, I’m not quite sure how Christians are supposed to feel about violent content like this. I mean, obviously we shouldn’t encourage violence, but at the same time this is a show with war, and war means violence. It’s never been much of a concern for me, as violent content has never been much of an issue, but since there are Christians opposed to violent content it does make me wonder.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: A flashback shows a pilot falling to his death; flashbacks of plans–and their pilots and gunners–being shot; planes are shown flying in the sky, with explosions below, and presumably surface-to-air fire being sent up; a character kicks a door open, then proceeds to yank the room’s occupant up by his shirt and punch him in the stomach; a character is thrown into water and kicked in the face

Blood/Gore: There may have been a bit of blood in the flashback

Review: Gundam Build Fighters, Episode 6: A Reason To Battle

Review:

Well, we finally get the big battle we’ve all been waiting for, but it certainly came early. Six episodes in, and a total carnage of a battle… it kind of feels anti-climactic. On the other hand, though, if this is what we get six episodes in, then what will the final climax of battles be? Really, they probably could have teased out some plot points from this, such as Reiji’s apathy at Yuuki’s withdrawal, but the problems arrive and resolve within this episode. I don’t know what purpose there is for this, but it just feels like we reached a milestone in the series while it’s still young. Regardless, the big battle for this episode was great to watch.

It’s also cute to watch how Sei and China are slowly growing closer together. Apparently Sei’s mom thinks so, too. Outside of that, there doesn’t seem to be a whole lot of development in character relationships, other than the whole Yuuki/Reiji & Sei thing. Other than that, Mr. Ral does pop up to offer some wisdom to Reiji, but it’s wisdom that we could all consider: why do we engage in hobbies? Specifically, Mr. Ral is addressing Reiji’s thoughts about Gunpla battle, but we can probably apply what he has to say to any hobby that we partake in.

Of course, the series does still have some of those eye-roll worthy moments that come with anime such as Yu-Gi-Oh and Beyblade, mainly in reference to how seriously people are reacting while playing a game with toys. At least in Build Fighters, though, the Gunpla are shown as if they were real, which at least makes the battles more intense than two tops beating against each other. Honestly, I have no real complaints about the show, other than the fact that the pacing could have been done differently, but I am looking at it from the present view instead of the overall view, so perhaps it will make more sense as the story continues to unfold.

A Christian Perspective:

Watch out for that episode preview. This is as bad as it gets: Sei’s mom in a bikini, which of course means cleavage. China is shown in a school swimsuit, which isn’t really fanservicey in and of itself. So it’s certainly not the worst on the fanservice scale, although it is more than what we’re used to from this show (well, okay, Kirara was probably worse than this). Hopefully the context of the next episode isn’t simply to throw in some fanservice. Beyond that is just the typical Gundam fight violence. The big battle in this episode is particularly gruesome, at least as gruesome as two robots beating each other up can get. I’d venture to guess that most people who have watched this far aren’t bothered by this kind of violent content, though.

Content Guide:

Langauge: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: In the preview, Sei’s mom and China are shown at the beach, with China wearing what looks like a school swimsuit and Sei’s mom in a bikini (which, of course, means cleavage)

Violence: Gundam battles, one in particular being “gruesome” in terms of robot destruction

Blood/Gore: None