Category Archives: The Pilot’s Love Song

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 3: The Wind Revolution

Review:

Last week we received a pretty significant revelation about one character’s past, and this week we were able to see exactly how things came to pass. Not right away, of course. Something tells me that this will be one of those series that likes to toy with your emotions, because this particular episode starts out fairly normally: flight training, rivalries, Claire, etc, before launching us into full-on back-story mode at the beginning of the second half. The whole incident is pretty dark, and it certainly serves to show why Kal has such a strong hatred for Nina Viento. Overall, the staff does a good job of presenting the back-story in a way that doesn’t feel rushed, but that also doesn’t take up a huge chunk of time, either. We’re back in the current portion of the story before the episode’s end, with a cliff-hanger to boot.

We also get a brief glimpse at what Ignacio’s connection to Kal is. Of course, it’s extremely brief and doesn’t say much, leaving the actual status of their relationship in question, but at least now we have an idea as to how Ignacio fits into the story. It’s probably safe to assume that this isn’t going to be a series with a neat and tidy ending to each episode, but rather a show with a large plot that will slowly unfold over time. If so, then we can probably expect a lot of unanswered questions (or slowly answered questions) and a lot of cliffhangers.

One thing I would like to touch upon is a conversation that is had between two characters on the topic of forgiveness. A character remarks to another that, “If you forgive, the light will wipe away the darkness.” Obviously, this message is quite in line with Christianity. Jesus goes so far as to say that if we do not forgive, then the Father will not forgive us (Mark 11:26). Forgiveness is a key point in Christianity, so seeing this line in the episode certainly connected.

A Christian Perspective:

Not much to say here. There were a few bad words, and the most bloodless revolution ever. The only violence shown included air ships being shot down, along with explosions. There was a scene with a guillotine, but we don’t actually observe the decapitation, so I wouldn’t really include that as “violent” content. The only person-on-person violence occurs when one character tackles another. Beyond that, there was a scene where a character was controlling the wind, perhaps with magic, though it isn’t really explored.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “b*st**d”, 1 “wh**e”, 1 “d**n

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None, outside of the previously mentioned intro scene (I don’t intend to repeat intro/outro material each week, unless the intro/outro changes)

Violence: Explosions, air combat, a character is tackled

Blood/Gore: None

Other: a character appears to use magic

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 2: Cadoques High, Aerial Division

Review:

I can already see that this show is going to be a slow build. Without spoiling much, we get some distinct hints in the beginning of the episode that this little trip on Isla isn’t just for fun and games. Couple that with Benjamin’s question about the island’s armaments, and there are some serious questions that are begging for answers—answers that aren’t to be found in this episode.

In the end, I would say this episode serves to be more of a character introduction than anything else. We meet some new characters, as well as some returning faces from the pilot episode (no pun intended), and we get to learn a bit about several characters’ motivations for coming to Isla. We also get to see a bit more of the ‘tension’, if you will, between the commoner and noble classes. I guess it shouldn’t be much of a surprise, though, that the nobles look down on the commoners; that’s a pretty basic plot point, I think. Still, I suppose the division would lose some of its significance if we didn’t actually see the tension in action. All-in-all, the scene itself is silly—in terms of what causes the conflict, I mean—which serves to show just how shallow the nobles within this series may very well be. Okay, so that’s probably a bit too generalized at this point.

In the end, there isn’t a lot of plot advancement in this series, and what little advancement we do have mostly happens at the end. I must admit, I think my pre-conceived notions about Ignacio Axis (the unnamed silver-haired character from the first episode) may be wrong. I had pegged him as Kal’s inevitable rival—in school and, possibly, for Claire’s affections. Now, as of the end of this episode (which also reveals a bit of a surprise), I’m not quite sure what his role may be. However, I’m fairly certain that we can say Kal has made a rival for himself in the form of Fausto Fidel Melze. You’ll see why. I’m trying to make it a point to not actually spoil anything in these reviews.

If you’re looking for an action-packed show, then you’ll have to look elsewhere (at least for now). As it stands, I think The Pilot’s Love Song may very well be more character-driven than plot-driven—at least for the time being. This seems like a show that’s geared more towards people who want to connect with the characters, and possibly have their hearts ripped out later on.

A Christian Perspective:

Again, there’s not a whole lot to say here. There is one use of profanity within the episode, a couple of scenes where characters are punched in the stomach, and a perverse comment made by Admiral Luis. Honestly, the perverse comment may be the worst of them all. In the end, I think it comes down to your personal scruples, at least for now.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “b**t*rd”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: Several female characters in one-piece bathing suits are shown during the intro

Violence: The intro shows airplane combat; A noble student punches a commoner student; One teacher punches another

Blood/Gore: None

Other: Not sure if this should go in language or N/S/F, but Luis makes a comment about enjoying screams of pleasure from young ladies (in response to the students cheering for him)

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 1: Island of New Journeys

Review:

Welcome to The Pilot’s Love Song, a show about–well, actually, I don’t exactly know what the plot is. What I do know is that the show centers around Kal-El Albus and, to a lesser degree, his sister Ariel, who have joined the Cadoques High school as part of Aerial Division, Class 1B. While not a whole lot is revealed about the setting of the story, I can tell you that there’s something about a raindrop landing on a flagstone and that flagstone breaking into pieces, as well as a floating island called Isla. Said floating island is the location of the aforementioned school. Okay, so at first glance, this all sounds weird, but honestly the first episode was great, and if nothing else it does a good job of introducing the characters and setting while also stirring some things underneath.

What we do know is that these pilots are on a journey to find the End of the Sky. Why? Well, I’m not sure. Either I missed something, or that’s kind of the whole point of the show. Beyond that, as I said, we get to meet several characters, though most of their roles are yet to be seen. Kal is, certainly, the protagonist of the show, and the unnamed silver-haired boy we meet I suspect to be the future antagonist/rival to Kal. We are also introduced to a female character named Claire Cruz who, judging by this episode and the ending, will probably be Kal’s love interest (and, if theshow follows standard anime logic, also the silver-haired guy’s). Other characters introduced include classmates Noriaka Kashiwabara and Mitsuo Fukuhara, as well as Shizuka Hazome, the dorm manager for Kal’s dorms. We are (briefly) introduced to a character early on whose name is Nina Viento. What her role is, exactly, is unknown, but the sight of her sends Kal into a brief rage.

As for the setting: As previously mentioned, the show looks to take place on a floating (and mobile) island called Isla. There seems to be a division between “noble” students and, well, everyone else. Class 1B, for example, is left off the bus to walk after a point, while the rest of the students remain on the bus. Claire, the girl Kal befriends, also appears to be a noble, as Kal walks her home, but cannot proceed past a point called Hacienda Gate, because it is the entrance to the nobles’ area, and he lacks a pass.

So there you have it. A lot of information, but what to do with it? I suppose you’ll have to come back to find out. Other things I’d like to point out, though, are that the artwork looks great (although I am far from an art critic, so spare me if you disagree), and that this really gave me a ‘Last Exile’ feel at first glance. While the first episode seems to open doors and questions more than anything, it does do a great job of hooking you, and I know I’m certainly looking forward to seeing where it goes. Will you join me?

A Christian Perspective:

As of now, there’s not a whole lot to say here. The biggest issue you may have is the fact that they have created their own creation story for this series. Granted, there’s no indication that this show actually takes place on Earth, so I guess it all depends on your personal approach to fantasy series with made up gods/creations/etc. Beyond that, I do expect there to be action in this show. The opening scene features an aerial battle, so I would expect more of the same to come in eventually. Otherwise, there was only one use of harsh language, and the closest thing to fanservice was the intro, which showed female characters in bathing suits.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “h**l”

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: The intro shows several female characters in one-piece bathing suits

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Violence: The series starts off with a massive aerial fight between planes; combat scenes in the intro

Blood/Gore: None

Other: A story is being told about rain hitting a flagstone and pleading with god (the subtitles put the g as a lowercase), so whether this is supposed to actually be a reference to God or just the idea of “a” god within the story, I don’t know.