Category Archives: The Pilot’s Love Song

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 13: The Sky Where You Are

Review:

If I had to sum up the final episode of The Pilot’s Love Song in one word it would be “underwhelming”. I had expected something centering around the attempt to re-take Claire, but what we get instead is a homecoming, as all of the people from Isla return to their homeland. True, Kal does make an appeal to the people for a second Isla project in order to retrieve Claire, but plans don’t exactly amount to action. Most of the episode centers around the characters, their relationships, and what their lives are like post-return. I suppose it’s not “bad” in the sense that it’s not entertaining, but it’s certainly not what I was hoping to see.

Admittedly, there are a couple of interesting points in this episode. Kal’s RA, for example, is revealed to be more than she appears. What that is, exactly, isn’t explained, but it certainly leaves the viewer guessing (and, perhaps, holding onto hope for a second season). The ending of the episode finally gives the viewers what they wanted–Kal attempting to rescue Claire. If you wanted one final dose of action, then the final episode delivers, although it certainly doesn’t end with a solid conclusion. Whether this will be the end of the series or the starting point for a second season can only be guessed at right now.

A Christian Perspective:

In terms of content, there is some bad language–including one use of blasphemy, characters are shown with glasses of what I assume is beer (although whether this is an issue for you or not will ultimately depend on what you believe about Christians and alcohol), and some violent imagery.

In terms of message, this episode continues with the theme of forgiveness. Kal’s speech to the crowd is a good example of this in particular, and it is a lesson that all of us who claim the name of Christ could stand to learn from.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “d**n”; 1 “j**z”

Alcohol/Drug Use: Characters are shown with glasses full of what is presumably beer

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: A character is punched in the stomach; at the end of the episode is a battle–planes are shot down and whatnot

Blood/Gore: None

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 12: The End of the Sky

Review:

I came into this episode thinking that it was the finale, so I had a lot of thoughts in regard to that. Thankfully, most of those thoughts are now null and void, since we still have one episode next week. I’m just going to go ahead and put a spoiler warning here, because I just want to talk about the episode, so–SPOILER WARNING!!!

The episode begins after a six month time skip, before quickly jumping back to sometime shortly after the events of the previous episode. I was not pleased with the direction the plot took, despite the fact that this show pretty much sets itself up for a sad ending. Combine that with last week’s mention of a “final sacrifice”, and it should be no surprise that Claire and Kal are essentially being separated. Expecting it and liking it are two different things, though.

In comparison to the preceding episodes, this one is kind of anti-climatic. Whereas we were previously worrying about the fate of our characters, we are now simply watching relationships resolve and be healed. It seems that everyone has put their grudges to rest: Kal admits his love for Claire (and his determination to see her again), and Ignacio calls Kal his stupid older brother, although I don’t think Kal knows yet that Igna is his illegitimate brother. Still, the hostility that Ignacio held against Kal in the past seems to have passed. Of course, once you’ve faced death with a person and relied on them, I guess grudges seem a bit pointless.

So we wrap things up and then skip back to the present time to see the crew approaching the End of the Sky. As it turns out, this whole thing was part of the religion of this world, to fulfill the prophecy (and perhaps see if it was even true). Isla hits the End of the Sky and begins to disintegrate. That’s it. For all of the deaths and drama of the series, it is kind of anti-climatic. Of course, next week should (hopefully) have Kal now living up to his promise to come back for Claire, so let’s hope that everything goes well there.

I suppose these characters did finally deserve a break after everything they’ve been through, but when you think about it, doesn’t this episode kind of feel like a long epilogue?

A Christian Perspective:

The only content worth mentioning is that one character is considered to be a messiah-figure, but I do have a perspective to share.

As I’ve previously mentioned, the theme of forgiveness is big in this show. Kal is able to forgive Nina/Claire, and ultimately his love for her wins (as seen in this episode), and Ignacio is finally able to put to rest his old hatred for Kal. Even greater, though, is this episode’s conclusion. Essentially, the search for the End of the Sky was related to the religion of the world, which everyone seemed to consider as more of a myth than anything, judging by their reactions to the discovery. So, in the end, that which they considered to be myth turned out to be truth. I think that’s something we Christians can relate to. A lot of people chalk what we believe up to nothing by myth and superstition, yet they have no real proof other than their own disbelief. While we can’t set out on a giant floating island to search for Heaven, the point is still the same. People doubt the existence of something simply because they have never seen it, only to be held in awe and wonder when they do finally discover that it’s true. Such was the case in this series, and such will be the case on the Day of the Lord’s return (or, even, on the day when we each meet our own end).

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: None

Blood/Gore: None

Other: A character is presented to be a messiah-like figure

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 11: Love Song

Review:

This episode does a good job of keeping you on the edge of your seat, and of preparing the series for a close. I thought it might last longer than this, but it seems like I was wrong. Is there more that could be explored? I’m sure. I doubt they’ll be reaching their goal next episode, but I don’t see how they could make the series any more dramatic than it’s already been. It’s a pretty tense episode that doesn’t give you much time to relax, as it seems that a character (or characters) you care about is/are in the hot seat at any given point.

In all honesty, I can’t think of a whole lot to say here. I think the tension was well done, and the action scenes were great. The episode’s end could certainly pave the way for more material if the writers cared to carry it on, and they leave us with one more cliffhanger for next week. Maybe they’ll surprise me and the series will continue past next week’s episode, but it certainly seems like they’re preparing to wrap this story up. The only thing I can think to say is that one character’s change of heart is kind of abrupt, and could have probably been teased out a bit more prior to this, but then again sometimes a dire situation can really make us gauge what we’re doing.

A Christian Perspective:

Lots of violence and some blood. If either of these is an issue for you, then you probably won’t enjoy this episode, as the vast majority of this episode involves aerial combat and explosions. There are only a few uses of harsh language, though there are also euphemisms, and a character (I’m sure you can figure out who) uses what I’ll call magic, because I don’t know what else to call it.

**Don’t read the rest unless you’ve watched the episode**

A good lesson from this episode is that of forgiveness. The theme has been briefly explored before, as Kal remembered his mom’s words from the past, but the theme plays out full circle in this episode. As the situation really seems to take a dire turn, Kal finally begins to consider what his mother taught him, and makes the decision to forgive Claire for what happened in the past. Kal’s forgiveness, in turn, allows Claire to once again use her powers, which ends up saving the battleship. As Christians, we are called to forgive, but let’s not wait until it’s almost too late. Let’s learn to forgive as quickly as possible–immediately, even–so that we’re not held in bitter chains for days, weeks, months, or even years of our lives.

Matthew 6:14 – For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. (NIV)

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “h**l”; 1 “d**n”; euphemisms

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: Battleships shooting at each other; planes shooting at another plane; a battleship is hit and a section of it is blown up; a plane is shot and explodes; a plane is shot at; there is a large explosion; a battleship is bombed and it explodes; a plane is shot and explodes; another plane explodes; more planes are shot (and, of course, explode); a battleship is hit with missiles; more plane shooting; more explosions

Blood/Gore: A character is shown with his hand missing, and his sleeve is torn and bloody; a character is shown with blood on his face

Other: A character uses something like magic (I’m sure you can figure out who)

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 10: Sky of Courage

Review:

Well, that takes care of Ignacio’s back story. Seriously, does anyone in this show have a happy past? Granted, this does make it more interesting as to why he seems to be going out of his way to help Kal. Once that’s over, we get a resolution to last week’s ending, and then more plot happens. The happy moments may never return to this show, as our characters are yet again sent out like sheep to the slaughter as another enemy attack is coming. This time, though, we see divisions caused, especially with the military staff, and a large portion of the student base actually flees. Only two pairs of pilots actually fly out. One pair is probably protected by plot armor, but the other duo… I don’t expect them to make it back alive.

Where the show will go from here is anybody’s guess. It seems a little soon to have another heavy tragedy on our hands, so maybe my prediction about character deaths won’t come true. The battle seems believable enough, as they are pretty much in enemy territory. The bigger problem, though, will probably be the internal struggles that will result from the military’s decision to again use students in battle, despite the previous battle’s losses. That’s… about it, really. I’m short on commentary for this episode.

A Christian Perspective:

While it’s not used in a sexual sense, there is some partial female nudity near the beginning of the episode. A woman has a blanket(?) draped around her shoulders, so a portion of her breasts is exposed. Other than that, there is no nudity or sexual content to this episode, but there is some cussing, including one use of the Lord’s name in vain, and of course there is violence. There is also a scene where a character seems to hear a deceased character speaking to him, kind of like how Luke Skywalker heard Obi-Wan tell him to “use the force” in the first Star Wars movie. A little supernatural there, if that kind of stuff makes you nervous.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “h**l”, 1 “j**z”, 2 “d**n”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: A woman is showed with only a blanket draped around her, exposing part of her front, including a portion of her breasts

Violence: A character is punched, kneed in the stomach, and back-handed, and punched, kneed, and punched some more; a man is thrown to the ground; another man is detained by two guards; heavy aerial fire, a plane getting shot down; air combat, planes shot down

Blood/Gore: None

Other: A character seems to receive inspiration from a deceased character in an Obi-wan “use the force, Luke” kind of way

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 9: Your Name

Review:

Hey, what’s that sound? Yeah, that whistling sound, what is it? Oh, right, that’s the sound of the Feels Train coming into station. Seriously, I felt myself tear up a bit when everyone was mourning the loss of their friends, and the episode just keeps it up from there. Of course, I think last week’s preview sort of ruined the big “reveal” of this episode, if I remember correctly, but seeing how it plays out is still worth seeing, and a bit unexpected, although I don’t quite get how the two characters who connect the dots between Claire/Nina Viento actually manage to do so. Their revelations are just kind of… there, but it’s possible that I’ve missed something. There was actually a discussion about this in regards to one of the characters in the CrunchyRoll comments section (yes, I do spend some time there), but I won’t regurgitate that here.

So yeah, we’re left with the remainder of our cast broken-hearted, our hero dismayed, and our heroine not exactly in good shape, either. Where this is all going is anyone’s guess, although next episode’s preview shows us a flight pairing that I didn’t exactly expect. It’s also interesting to see just how much Ignacio is opening up as a character. While the flower scene turned out to not be exactly what I thought it was (I assumed he brought the flowers of his own volition, but that appears to be wrong), his actions to help another character part way through the episode, as well as his actions at the end of the episode, seem to suggest that he might have a heart in there somewhere. What his overall role in the story will be, I don’t know, but right now he certainly appears to be more friend than foe, and hopefully it’ll stay that way.

I’m going to predict that this will be a full 25-26 episode series, as I really don’t see how they can tie this story up in three or four episodes, at least not without it being a rush job. It still continues to be an enjoyable show, and I look forward to seeing what happens next week. I wonder which train will come into the station then?

A Christian Perspective:

There wasn’t much concerning content in this one. The worst was the violence, most of which was in the form of flashbacks, although there is something of a beat down at the end of the episode. Honestly, though, if you were fine with the previous episode, then the violence in this episode should be tolerable. Truth be told, I’m not quite sure how Christians are supposed to feel about violent content like this. I mean, obviously we shouldn’t encourage violence, but at the same time this is a show with war, and war means violence. It’s never been much of a concern for me, as violent content has never been much of an issue, but since there are Christians opposed to violent content it does make me wonder.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: A flashback shows a pilot falling to his death; flashbacks of plans–and their pilots and gunners–being shot; planes are shown flying in the sky, with explosions below, and presumably surface-to-air fire being sent up; a character kicks a door open, then proceeds to yank the room’s occupant up by his shirt and punch him in the stomach; a character is thrown into water and kicked in the face

Blood/Gore: There may have been a bit of blood in the flashback

Review: The Piltot’s Love Song, Episode 8: The Name of the Bird

Review:

Well that was… intense. We pick up pretty much where we left off last week, with the trainees going out to fight against the enemy in an attempt to defend Isla. Of course, Isla is getting devastated at the same time, and really the whole thing is just a huge mess. The vast majority of this episode is devoted to action scenes, so if you’re not a fan of violence/combat then this may not be too enjoyable for you. Of course, skipping this episode may raise questions in subsequent episodes (such as, where did so-and-so go?).
 
Honestly, this was a sad episode, and at the same time kind of frustrating. Killing off a couple of well-developed characters is certainly a good way to get an emotional reaction. Massacring a large number, on the other hand, kind of dulls the feeling, because it stops being surprising after a while. I suppose there is always the potential that the viewer will hold on to hope until a character is gone. Okay, I suppose I was fairly disappointed when I saw who all died this time around. I guess it is a bit conflicting, too. On the one hand, I think it probably would have been more impactful to just have a couple characters killed off. On the other hand, I suppose it is more realistic to see a bunch of trainees in garbage planes get decimated by the much more advanced enemy aircraft (thanks Crunchyroll comments section).
 
The Crunchyroll comments section does raise another good point, though, of how the trainees were able to shoot down armored planes with their rifles, while one trainee plane takes a decent amount of damage and still remains airborne. It didn’t occur to me until reading that, but I suppose that is a bit over the top. It may just be that it’s easier to suspend your disbelief while watching the show, though, and I never would have thought it absurd had I not scrolled through the comments. Such is the price I pay for reading through them, I suppose.
 
My final point of criticism is the end of the episode. The two characters featured there seem way too happy, given the number of people they just watched die. Granted, I’ve never been through a combat situation, and I certainly don’t know what it feels like to be among the few survivors of a tragic event, so maybe there is some legitimate explanation for it, but seeing two characters tease each other while showing no real signs of sadness kind of makes the moment feel unrealistic.
 
Despite all of these criticisms, though, I wouldn’t even think to call this a bad episode. That probably doesn’t make much sense, but I did enjoy it, and wanted to see what would happen. Honestly, they do kind of keep you wondering about a certain character’s fate (a character whose death would probably be more impactful than any of the others that took place this time around). We also get to see Ignacio actually do something this time around. I’m still not sure what his ultimate role will end up being, but thanks to the last episode we now have an idea as to what his purpose on Isla is. Judging from the previews, next week’s episode also appears to be intense, although in a different way, especially if what I think is going to happen actually happens.
A Christian Perspective:
Violence is the primary issue this time around, at least if you are opposed to portrayals of violence. Thankfully none of it is “graphic” or gory, although there is some blood shown, but even that is scarce, which is surprising given the number of deaths in this episode. There is plenty of air combat going on, as well as human versus human combat. Beyond that, there are a few uses of vulgar language, one of which involves Jesus’ name in vain.
Content Guide:

Language: 2 “d**n”, 1 “j**z”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: Houses and buildings are bombed; planes fire at each other; planes go down in flames; a person is shown falling in the wreckage of a plane; anti-aircraft fire; people fire at each other, one person is shot; a man is shot through the head; more people are shot; more plane-on-plane gunfire, more planes destroyed, a scene that shows a gunner shot and killed; another gunner is shown to be shot and killed

Blood/Gore: Possibly some blood coming from the person falling in the plane’s wreckage; blood is shown soaking through a character’s jacket; another character has a cut with blood on his face

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 7: A Glorious Death

Review:

This episode would probably have packed more of a punch if it weren’t for the previous episode’s foreshadowing, the title of this episode, and the Crunchyroll comment section, but it was still a decent episode, and the climax was still emotional. If you’ve watched the previous episode, then you probably have your theories about what will happen, so it kind of becomes a waiting game to see when/how it will happen, moreso than if it will happen.

Anyway, if you were tiring of the slow, dramatic pace of this series, then feel relieved: there’s a lot more action this time around. Of course, the drama is still there, as we find the enemy to be more sly than the characters gave them credit for, and as we wait to see what will ultimately happen in this episode, particularly with certain characters. I think it’s safe to say that it keeps you engaged and waiting.

Honestly, I don’t really have any gripes with this episode, except maybe that the climax was a little watered down thanks to the previous foreshadowing. Then again, without that foreshadowing, we may well have not cared at all, so I suppose it was kind of a trade off. All-in-all, The Pilot’s Love Song continues to be enjoyable, and I’m now stuck waiting for the next episode (which appears to contain more action).

A Christian Perspective:

Violence will be the factor this time around. Surprisingly, there is only one instance of vulgar language the entire time. On the other hand, there is a lot of air combat going on, with planes being shot down and ultimately exploding. Most of the violence is like this: plane-on-plane, but there is one scene where a character is shot, and there are a few instances of blood. It’s nothing really gory, but if you’re sensitive to any kind of violence, or to blood, then tread carefully. If this doesn’t bother you, then you’ll probably be fine with this episode.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “d**n”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: Air combat, with planes being shot and subsequently exploding; aircraft are attacked with bombs and missiles; an aircraft is shown going down in flames; more of the air fighting, missile shooting, explosions; a character is shot; two planes are shot and explode close up; more planes are shot; the preview shows more gun fire and whatnot

Blood/Gore: Blood is shown running down the front of a character’s head, and then on the character’s glove; blood is shown coming from a character’s gunshot wound; a wounded character is shown in the preview for the next episode

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 6: The Holy Spring

Review:

Have I ever said that I think this show will be a slow build? Well, if I haven’t (though I think I have), let this be my statement on it. Case in point, last week’s episode ended with a bit of action, yet this week’s episode begins with a triumphal approach to the Holy Spring, without any initial mention of the previous episode’s attack. I almost wondered if I missed something. We eventually get around to that, though. So, what happens now? Assault? Tension? Casualties? Nope: ramen.

Seriously, much of this episode involves Kal’s dorm having a restaurant event where they serve “Ari-men”, or Ariel’s ramen. Apparently it’s so good that it even shuts up the snooty rich students. What, exactly, they’re raising money for I don’t know, but it seems the whole dorm (plus Claire) teamed up to make this happen, with even Ignacio chipping in. Yet despite all of this merrymaking, there is a definite tension under the surface, as discussions of using the flight students for Holy Spring recon pops up. The whole thing is pretty much interwoven between scenes of otherwise lighthearted happenings, and it’s used to bring attention to Chiharu, who picks up on one particular discussion between the instructors and Admiral Louis.

Actually, one of the cutest scenes in this episode involves Chiharu and Mitsuo. I won’t ruin the details, but it was nice to see the two of them in the spotlight, especially with the main focus generally being on Kal and Claire. Hey, side characters can fall in love too, you know! Here’s hoping that next week’s episode doesn’t have a negative outcome for our potential couple, although the title of the episode (and some of the comments on Crunchyroll) may not leave room for a whole lot of hope. This show is torture, I tell you! Torture! Well, now to wait until next week.

A Christian Perspective:

This was a fairly safe episode. There were two instances of vulgar language, and a few scenes of violence that was more slapstick/comical/lighthearted than anything else (except for that kick to the shin). I don’t see there being too much of an issue for most Christians with this one.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “b*st**d”, 1 “d**n it”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: a character is hit in the back of the head with a cooking tool (maybe a strainer?), a character is kicked in the shin; a character is put in a choke hold and given a noogie to the side of the head

Blood/Gore: None

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 5: The Girl Who Calls the Wind

Review:

Obligatory swim suit episode! Granted, it was much more tasteful than the average swim suit episode, although it still had its moments, particularly with the female teacher’s suit (although it was a one piece, so still more conservative than the typical swim suit episode).

Anyway, we can be thankful that the entire episode wasn’t devoted to the beach and swimsuits. The first half of the episode does play out more or less like a typical swim suit episode, complete with an “oops, we fell and almost kissed” moment, but the second half actually brings some plot. As in the previous two weeks, this episode also contains a bit of back story, this time for Claire. In it, we get to see just how she became her alter ego, and we also get to see how she came to be on Isla. Unlike the previous two episodes, though, this episode’s flashback material makes up only a small portion of the total run time.

This episode was a mixed bag. On the one hand, we had the light-hearted fun and games of beach play, but on the other we had the tumultuous relationship between Kal and Claire. It seems that Claire strongly suspects that Kal is Karl la Hire (good guess), although Kal doesn’t seem to have any inkling that Claire is… well, you should know, and if you don’t I won’t spoil it… yet. This, of course, leads to some tension in this episode, as Claire seems to withdraw while Kal tries to figure out what’s going on. This doesn’t last too long, though, as the two declare their desire to fly the skies together… and plot strikes! Unfortunately, we’ll have to wait until next week to see the plot continue, but it seems like the action may finally pick up in this show.

One thing that initially hit me, though, is that the animation seemed to be of a little lesser quality, at least in the beginning. It may just be me, though, as I’m not an animation expert.

A Christian Perspective:

Well, it’s a swim suit episode, so as you can expect we see many of the students in their swimsuits. This really amounts to the boys in swim trunks and the girls in one-piece suits, so at least it’s not nearly as fanservicey as your typical swim suit episode. The female teacher is shown in a flashier one piece, as well, and the male teacher in a Speedo, so take note of that. The most fanservicey thing that occurs is when Ariel tickles Claire (they are in the water and, of course, in their bathing suits). The camera zooms in on Claire and pans up her body, of course bringing attention to her breasts, which they must (of course) make bounce. Actually I think there were a few instances of “bouncing breasts” in this episode, so be aware of that. There is also the instance of “We fell down and are about to kiss” with Claire and Kal, although nothing is overtly fanservicey about this except for the (typical) pose that they fall into.

With all that said, it probably sounds worse than it actually is. My biggest gripe is, of course, the unnecessary focus on Claire’s breasts during the tickling scene. The bathing suits weren’t really fanservicey, so I don’t think that will give most people too much trouble. Beyond that is a bit of language, a few violent scenes, and the use of “magic”, as well as the mention of a “god”. I don’t know if this is supposed to be a polygamous world or not. So keep that in mind if you don’t like fantasy/fiction stories that feature made-up gods.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “j**z”, 1 “h*ll”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: The female teacher is shown in a one-piece bathing suit; the male teacher is shown in a Speedo; the male students are shown in swimming trunks and the female students in one piece bathing suits; there is a scene where Ariel tickles Claire while she’s in her bathing suit–the camera zooms in and pans up Claire’s body, showing her breasts bouncing; they pull the typical “male and female character trip, resulting in the male character hovering over the female character” routine

Violence: A whirlwind destroys at least part of a town–people are shown under debris; a mock air battle is shown–a plane is shot with a paintball; a plane is shown crashing into a mountain and exploding; a plane is shot and it explodes; a second plane is shot

Blood/Gore: None

Other: a character is shown using “magic”; a character mentions a “wind god” and being blessed by “a god”

Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 4: Sea of Stars

Review:

Last week’s episode introduced us to Kal’s painful past, and this week’s episode finishes by showing us what his new life as a peasant was like. The whole thing is fairly well balanced, though. We still get plenty of scenes in the present time, where Kal and Claire are adrift at sea while Ariel and the rest of the class wait in anticipation for some news from the search crew. In short, it’s a character-building episode.

Among some of the information disclosed is that Kal had three adopted sisters (and all the men groaned), who is the eldest between Kal and Ariel, and how Kal enjoyed his first bowl of ramen. Okay, so it’s not all sunshine and roses. One scene in particular shows how a young Kal saw a play depicting the overthrow of his parents. It was later that same day, though, that Kal was able to experience flying for the first time.

Seeing the contrast between the two scenes is also interesting. Ariel is concerned and worried for her brother, while Kal seems pretty content at sea. Granted, I’m sure he’d rather not be stranded at sea, but he and Claire certainly seem to be calm for a good portion of their voyage. Claire also uses the opportunity to attempt to change Kal’s perspective on Ariel, which doesn’t seem to fall entirely on deaf ears. The episode’s end also brings a plot twist, though it’s one that I had seen speculated in the Crunchyroll comments.

I believe I previously stated that I expect this show to be a slow build. The action will either be limited, with a greater focus on the characters, or the show will help us to fall in love with the characters before launching them into all-out war, killing off many whom we’ve come to know and love. Those are my predictions, anyway, and I think either would be fine for this show, although the intro definitely gives at least some hints of action to be had. I’d also like to see what, exactly, Ignacio’s loyalties are, especially given his actions early on in this episode.

A Christian Perspective:

Not much to say here. For once, the N/S/F category is entirely for our female viewers! Okay, so it’s nothing too scandalous: just Kal’s bare chest and Kal in his underwear. Beyond that is some mild violence, but not much else to note. Overall a very safe episode in terms of content.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: Kal is shown topless; Kal’s cover slips off, and we see him in his underwear

Violence: a teacher punches a student in the face; there is a fight between two kids (if it can even be called a fight); a character is hit several times

Blood/Gore:
None