Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 9: Your Name

Review:

Hey, what’s that sound? Yeah, that whistling sound, what is it? Oh, right, that’s the sound of the Feels Train coming into station. Seriously, I felt myself tear up a bit when everyone was mourning the loss of their friends, and the episode just keeps it up from there. Of course, I think last week’s preview sort of ruined the big “reveal” of this episode, if I remember correctly, but seeing how it plays out is still worth seeing, and a bit unexpected, although I don’t quite get how the two characters who connect the dots between Claire/Nina Viento actually manage to do so. Their revelations are just kind of… there, but it’s possible that I’ve missed something. There was actually a discussion about this in regards to one of the characters in the CrunchyRoll comments section (yes, I do spend some time there), but I won’t regurgitate that here.

So yeah, we’re left with the remainder of our cast broken-hearted, our hero dismayed, and our heroine not exactly in good shape, either. Where this is all going is anyone’s guess, although next episode’s preview shows us a flight pairing that I didn’t exactly expect. It’s also interesting to see just how much Ignacio is opening up as a character. While the flower scene turned out to not be exactly what I thought it was (I assumed he brought the flowers of his own volition, but that appears to be wrong), his actions to help another character part way through the episode, as well as his actions at the end of the episode, seem to suggest that he might have a heart in there somewhere. What his overall role in the story will be, I don’t know, but right now he certainly appears to be more friend than foe, and hopefully it’ll stay that way.

I’m going to predict that this will be a full 25-26 episode series, as I really don’t see how they can tie this story up in three or four episodes, at least not without it being a rush job. It still continues to be an enjoyable show, and I look forward to seeing what happens next week. I wonder which train will come into the station then?

A Christian Perspective:

There wasn’t much concerning content in this one. The worst was the violence, most of which was in the form of flashbacks, although there is something of a beat down at the end of the episode. Honestly, though, if you were fine with the previous episode, then the violence in this episode should be tolerable. Truth be told, I’m not quite sure how Christians are supposed to feel about violent content like this. I mean, obviously we shouldn’t encourage violence, but at the same time this is a show with war, and war means violence. It’s never been much of a concern for me, as violent content has never been much of an issue, but since there are Christians opposed to violent content it does make me wonder.

Content Guide:

Language: None

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: A flashback shows a pilot falling to his death; flashbacks of plans–and their pilots and gunners–being shot; planes are shown flying in the sky, with explosions below, and presumably surface-to-air fire being sent up; a character kicks a door open, then proceeds to yank the room’s occupant up by his shirt and punch him in the stomach; a character is thrown into water and kicked in the face

Blood/Gore: There may have been a bit of blood in the flashback

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Review: The Pilot’s Love Song, Episode 9: Your Name

  1. medievalotaku

    I don’t think Christians should have a problem with violence in a story as long as it’s for the sake of showing something better. For example, to make people admire the courage or perseverance of a particular character. However, violence for the sake of pleasure is rather deplorable.

    I need to get caught back up on this show. It sounds like it’s going somewhere.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Something More: The Invisible God of Arrietty, Christian Conquest Zvedza, and Lent for Otaku |

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s