Review: Golden Time, Episode 16: Wake Up Call

Review:

Well that certainly didn’t go like it could have. I admit, I do tend to browse through some of the comments on Crunchyroll, and there were certainly some theories about why Koko looked angry in last week’s episode preview. As far as I can remember, none of them hit the nail on the head. Admittedly, it probably would have made for a more dramatic plot, but what we received was more realistic. That’s not the only thing that ended up being different than you would suspect, either. The scene with Nana yelling at Banri was, in retrospect, kind of silly–at least when you consider why she was yelling. Well, I won’t spoil anything, but in some ways this episode certainly wasn’t as dramatic as you may have expected.

I will say that if you are looking for “action”, this episode doesn’t deliver a lot of it. The most you’ll find is in the beginning of the episode as the characters deal with the fallout from the accident. Watching the shakeup raises some questions, such as what is defined as a minor in Japan? As I understand it, Koko is 18, but a police officer refers to her as a minor. Later in the episode she refers to herself as an adult. What? Also, I really don’t know what to make of Koko’s dad. When we first encounter him in this episode, he gives the impression of being a jerk (just watch it and you’ll see), yet later in the episode he is welcoming to Banri, even leaving him alone to speak with Koko in her room (okay, the wisdom of that is questionable, but hopefully you see my point).

The brunt of this episode deals with Banri and Koko’s relationship (again). This is what I was referring to when I said it was more realistic. While the beginning of the argument seems to stem from Koko’s (in)ability to deal with the accident, it deteriorates into them arguing about how Banri chose to deal with his amnesia, and his past. We’ve been here before. The catalyst was different, but the core of the argument is the same. In my experience, it’s much like this in real life, too. Until an issue is resolved, it will ultimately be a source of contention in a relationship. It paints a much more life-like picture than everything being suddenly better between two episodes, but it doesn’t exactly lend itself to the utmost entertainment. The benefit is that if you’ve already invested this much time in the series, then you probably care about the characters enough to want to see this through, even if it’s not the pinnacle of entertainment. Maybe–hopefully–this will lead to a true turning point in Banri and Koko’s relationship (especially if the episode preview is any evidence).

Well, maybe the argument wouldn’t have gone the route that it did if Banri hadn’t reacted to Koko the way he did, but we could probably argue this train of thought into the ground. Either way, this week was much more solemn than last week, although the scene between Banri, Koko, and Koko’s dad was amusing.

A Christian Perspective:

As far as content goes, there’s not much to report here. There are three instances of vulgar language (all courtesy of Nana), but the worst is probably the violent content, particularly when a female character is smacked and knocked to the ground. Outside of that, there’s not really a lot of offensive content to be found in this episode.

Content Guide:

Language: 1 “d**n”, 1 “p***ing”, 1 “a**”

Alcohol/Drug Use: None

Nudity/Sex/Fanservice: None

Violence: a character is backhanded across the face and knocked to the ground; a character is beat over the head with bread; a character is hit with a pillow several times; a character is knocked to the ground

Blood/Gore: blood is shown under a character’s mouth

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One thought on “Review: Golden Time, Episode 16: Wake Up Call

  1. Pingback: Something More: V-Day Chocolates for Anime Jesus, Hell in Hoozuki no Reitetsu, and Yuri for Christians |

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